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  • George Blacksell

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    2nd April, 2014, 1:23 pm | George Blacksell

    In 2013 US corporations accumulated a total of $1.95 trillion outside the US. That is up 11.8 percent from the previous year. Corporation tax has been a hot topic of late, not least for the likes of Google, Starbucks and Amazon. They came under significant scrutiny for their tax avoidance practices. What’s more is that a new trend is emerging, as tech companies are rivaling the financial industry as the main stockpilers of these offshore cash reserves. Microsoft, Apple, and IBM account for over 18 percent of the total increase in reserves. Crucially, the direct result of these increasingly large

  • Corporate Citizenship

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    2nd April, 2014, 9:07 am | Corporate Citizenship

    Responsible Business Week  (March 31 to April 4 2014) draws contributors from around the world to demonstrate the positive impact that businesses can have on society. From online speakers to events across the nation, Responsible Business Week features a range of topics from developing future leaders to commercial sustainability and disruptive technologies. Corporate Citizenship’s co-founding Director, Amanda Jordan chaired a session in London on April 1st,  Growing youth social action – opportunities for business with speakers including Kate Van Der Plank, National Grid, Bill Eyres, Telefonica 02, Charlotte Hill, Step Up to Serve and UK Youth and young people participating in the Lloyds Scholars programme. The session explored

  • Corporate Citizenship

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    28th March, 2014, 1:10 pm | Corporate Citizenship

    When your business is subject to a constantly moving and tumbling horizon – when there are forces at work that you cannot predict or legislate for that impact upon your very survival – how do you build a resilient and flexible strategy that can carry you through? Businesses must analyse their impact on the wider world before they are able to build a successful strategy for the long term. The way that companies approach the job of strategic planning needs to change wholesale. Every business faces the same tough challenges, including how to grow revenues and forward plan in a fast-changing world and an uncertain

  • Thomas Milburn

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    21st March, 2014, 4:47 pm | Thomas Milburn

    The debate on gay rights in Russia defined a lot of the hype around the recent Sochi Winter Olympics. Corporate sponsors were the primary targets for activists. Even sponsoring a unifying event like the Olympics isn’t a simple decision anymore. The Olympics are supposed to be about building a better world, bringing people together in celebration of sport. The Olympic Rings symbolise the union of the five continents. In this regard, corporate partners and sponsors prefer to stay apolitical. However, such was the pressure that mounted on the main sponsors, that several of them released statements in response to the

  • Thomas Milburn

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    14th March, 2014, 11:48 am | Thomas Milburn

    Frustrating conversations. Anyone working in the corporate sustainability industry will have been part of at least one, probably more. These are often the result of people using the same words to mean very different things. Despite how far the field has come and how often we now talk about corporate responsibility, the reality that confronts conversations about responsible business is often one of ambiguity – leading to circular conversations, lack of consensus, and ultimately lack of decisions and actions. This is partly due to that fact that this field is worse than most for jargon. To begin with I’ve already

  • Jon Lloyd

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    10th March, 2014, 10:06 am | Jon Lloyd

    LBG’s recent research with NPC lifted the lid on impact practice. It found that more and more companies are taking a long hard look at the activities they support and are asking fundamental questions about the value they deliver, not just to society, but to the business too. It also shows that something of a schism has opened up in the way that companies approach their contributions. Where some are content to remain responsive and provide flexible funding others are becoming increasingly more targeted in what they support and goal-oriented in what they want to achieve. You can see the

  • Peter Truesdale

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    20th February, 2014, 3:19 pm | Peter Truesdale

    The inconvenient truth is nobody cares. Not one tittle. Not one jot. Zilcheroony. Nix. Nada. What they don’t care about is the potential effects of climate change. This has been abundantly clear since 2006 when the Stern Review Report on the Economics of Climate Change was released. It made a temporary talking point for the chatterati. It did not enter the bloodstream of debate. I hope Robin Harding’s excellent article in yesterday’s FT* sparks debate.  He argues that the economic models being used to measure the effects are knackered. He thinks as a result the World may be knackered too.

  • Corporate Citizenship

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    14th February, 2014, 11:54 am | Corporate Citizenship

    Being told not to waste food is something that was ingrained on me at a young age.  Possibly permanently marked on my consciousness due to the stress that having to eat my vegetables induced.  Even though clearing my plate is no longer a stressful process, it can be difficult to see the immediate connection between me and starving people on the other side of the world. But the issue has changed from when I was a fussy child. Those people in food poverty are no longer just on the other side of the world. They are down the road, in

  • Hugh Macpherson

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    4th February, 2014, 2:29 pm | Hugh Macpherson

    I’ve often written about American politics and climate change in this blog. It’s a bit of a bugbear of mine. Last week I read the transcript of Obama’s State of the Union address. I am feeling suitably warm of heart just now. He gave us the clearest indication yet that the discussion is over on whether climate change is a man-made phenomenon or not. Here’s how he did it: “Climate Change is fact.” Followed by “when our children’s children look us in the eye and ask if we did all we could to leave them a safer, more stable world…

  • Hugh Macpherson

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    28th January, 2014, 1:12 pm | Hugh Macpherson

    Julie Andrews once said/sang “Let’s start at the very beginning, a very good place to start”. She was wrong. Although to be fair to her she wasn’t exactly talking about how to measure the impacts of your community investment. It was something about how singing can help you evade the Nazis or something. I wasn’t really listening. Nevertheless when it comes to putting together a system to understand what impacts are, my advice is ignore Julie Andrews completely, she was dead wrong. In fact, the opposite is true. The very first thing that you need to establish when you’re putting